Working Class Mystic

A Spiritual Biography of George Harrison

Working Class Mystic

John Lennon called himself a working class hero. George Harrison was a working class mystic. Born in Liverpool as the son of a bus conductor and a shop assistant, for the first six years of his life he lived in a house with no indoor bathroom. This book gives an honest, in-depth view of his personal journey from his blue-collar childhood to his role as a world-famous spiritual icon. Author Gary Tillery’s approach is warmly human, free of the fawning but insolent tone of most rock biographers. He frankly discusses the role of drugs in leading Harrison to mystical insight but emphasizes that he soon renounced psychedelics as a means to the spiritual path. It was with conscious commitment that Harrison journeyed to India, studied sitar with Ravi Shankar, practiced yoga, learned meditation from the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, and became a devotee of Hinduism. George worked hard to subdue his own ego and to understand the truth beyond appearances. He preferred to keep a low profile, but his empathy for suffering people led him to spearhead the first rock-and-roll super event for charity. And despite his wealth and fame, he was always delighted to slip on overalls and join in manual labor on his grounds. At ease with holy men discussing the Upanishads and the Bhagavad Gita, he was ever the bloke from Liverpool whose father drove a bus, whose brothers were tradesmen, and who had worked himself as an apprentice electrician until the day destiny called. Tillery’s engaging narrative depicts Harrison as a sincere seeker who acted out of genuine care for humanity and used his celebrity to be of service in the world. Fans of all generations will treasure this book for the inspiring portrayal it gives of their beloved “quiet” Beatle.

Eva Perón

The Myths of a Woman

Eva Perón

Eva Perón, one of the most powerful women in the world at the time of her death in 1952, rose from humble origins to international renown as First Lady of Argentina and the force behind the throne of her husband Juan Perón. Despite her immense popularity, she was inaccessible to the people of Argentina, and so images were constructed around her to fill that void. According to Julie M. Taylor, these "myths" around Eva Perón reflect Argentine culture and political history at the time of her seven-year reign. With a brief biography of Eva Perón serving as a backdrop, Taylor offers a detailed analysis of the principle myths that grew around this enigmatic woman. "Taylor shows that she is remembered by different classes and political factions as saint, a revolutionary, or a whore, depending on whether she was interpreted as an embodiment or as a violation of the Argentine feminine ideal."—Booklist "Highly commendable . . . it deliberately eschews the sensationalism that characterizes earlier [biographies]. . . . Taylor instead concentrates on the myths that have lingered since her death. . . . [This book] transcends biography."—Gentlemen's Quarterly "[A] concise and brilliant examination of the legends that arose in Argentina during the lifetime . . . of a woman who broke with Argentine tradition and became a political figure in her own right."—New Yorker

Politics in Theology

Politics in Theology

This new volume examines the relationship between religion and politics from a historical perspective. Contributors address specific moments in which political governance intersects with religious ideals in dramatic ways. These moments question the relationship between religious sentiments and political solutions and threaten to reorder the geopolitical landscape. These essays discuss the tensions produced by secularism in an Islamic culture, the influence of Catholic theology in workers’ political movements, and how Hinduism has been transformed by the political process. Also featured are essays that emphasize how civil religion coincides with constitutional order, and how the drama of religious tolerance and legitimization of the power of Christian hierarchy originated in the political power of the Roman emperor. This volume is an interdisciplinary effort from up-and-coming and cutting-edge scholars. Contents include: “Something as Yet Unfinished,” Adam Stauffer; “Carl Schmitt, Leo Strauss, and the Necessity of Political Theology,” Grant N. Havers; “Escape from Theology,” Peter Grosvenor; “The Persistence of Civil Religion in Modern Canada,” John von Heyking; “The Politicization of Hinduism and the Hinduization of Politics,” Jeffery D. Long; “Ontology, Plurality, and Roman Catholic Social Teaching,” Roland Boer; “The Pseudo-Isidorian Decretals and Church-State Conflict,” Mary Sommar; “Thomas Aquinas on Providence, Prudence, and Natural Law,” Christopher S. Morrissey; “The Mystical Body of Christ and French Catholic Action, 1926-1949,” W. Brian Newsome; and “Secularism in Turkey,” Oya Dursun-Ozkanca.

No Less Than Mystic

A History of Lenin and the Russian Revolution for a 21st-Century Left

No Less Than Mystic

Published in the centenary year of the 1917 Russian Revolution, No Less Than Mystic is a fresh and iconoclastic history of Lenin and the Bolsheviks for a generation uninterested in Cold War ideologies and stereotypes. Although it offers a full and complete history of Leninism, 1917, the Russian Civil War and its aftermath, the book devotes more time than usual to the policies and actions of the socialist alternatives to Bolshevism – to the Menshevik Internationalists, the Socialist Revolutionaries (SRs), the Jewish Bundists and the anarchists. It prioritises Factory Committees, local Soviets, the Womens’ Zhenotdel movement, Proletkult and the Kronstadt sailors as much as the statements and actions of Lenin and Trotsky. Using the neglected writings and memoirs of Mensheviks like Julius Martov, SRs like Victor Chernov, Bolshevik oppositionists like Alexandra Kollontai and anarchists like Nestor Makhno, it traces a revolution gone wrong and suggests how it might have produced a more libertarian, emancipatory socialism than that created by Lenin and the Bolsheviks. Although the book broadly covers the period from 1903 (the formation of the Bolsheviks and Mensheviks) to 1921 (the suppression of the Kronstadt rebellion) and explains why the Bolshevik Revolution degenerated so quickly into its apparent opposite, it continually examines the Leninist experiment through the lens of a 21st century, de-centralised, ecological, anti-productivist and feminist socialism. Throughout its narrative it interweaves and draws parallels with contemporary anti-capitalist struggles such as those of the Zapatistas, the Kurds, the Argentinean “Recovered Factories”, Occupy, the Arab Spring, the Indignados and Intersectional feminists, attempting to open up the past to the present and points in between. We do not need another standard history of the Russian Revolution. This is not one.

Hinduism and the 1960s

The Rise of a Counter-Culture

Hinduism and the 1960s

The West has drawn upon Hinduism on a wide scale, from hatha yoga and meditation techniques, to popular culture in music and fashion, yet the contribution of Hinduism to the counter-culture of the 1960s has not been analysed in full. Hinduism and the 1960s looks at the youth culture of the 1960s and early 1970s, and the way in which it was influenced by Hinduism and Indian culture. It examines the origins of the 1960s counter-culture in the Beat movement of the 1950s, and their interest in Eastern religion, notably Zen. When the Beatles visited India to study transcendental meditation, there was a rapid expansion in interest in Hinduism. Young people were already heading east on the so-called 'Hippie Trail', looking for spiritual enlightenment and an escape from the material lifestyle of the West. Paul Oliver examines the lifestyle which they adopted, from living in ashrams to experimenting with drugs, sexual liberation, ayurvedic medicine and yoga. This engaging book analyses the interaction between Hinduism and the West, and the way in which each affected the other. It demonstrates the ways in which contemporary Western society has learned from the ancient religion of Hinduism, and incorporated such teachings as yoga, meditation and a natural holistic lifestyle, into daily life. Each chapter contains a summary and further reading guidance, and a glossary is included at the end of the book, making this ideal reading for courses on Hinduism, Indian religions, and religion and popular culture.

The Methuen Drama Guide to Contemporary Irish Playwrights

The Methuen Drama Guide to Contemporary Irish Playwrights

The Methuen Drama Guide to Contemporary Irish Playwrights is an authoritative single-volume guide to the work of twenty-five Irish playwrights from the 1960s to the present, written by a team of twenty-five eminent scholars from Ireland, the United States, Britain and Germany contributing individual studies to the work of each playwright. Each of the twenty-five chapters provides: a biographical introduction to the playwright and their work; a survey and concise analysis of each of the writer's published plays; a discussion of their style, dramaturgical concerns and the critical reception; and a full bibliography of published plays, listing of premieres and a select list of critical works. Playwrights covered include: Tom Murphy, Sebastian Barry, Marina Carr, Brian Friel, Thomas Kilroy, Martin McDonagh, Frank McGuinness, Mark O'Rowe, Christina Reid, Enda Walsh and many more. Unrivalled in its coverage of recent work and writers, this collection surveys and analyses the breadth, vitality and development of theatrical work to emerge from Ireland over the last fifty years.

In and of [electronic Resource] : Memoirs of a Mystic Journey Along Canada's Wild West Coast

In and of [electronic Resource] : Memoirs of a Mystic Journey Along Canada's Wild West Coast

This is the modern, autobiographical account of the author's journey into the primitive wilderness of coastal British Columbia, and into the uncharted wilderness of the soul. It is both an inward journey, and an outward quest. The book is a rambling narrative, filled with unique insights, and presented in an introspective style. It is a true tale of adventure, misadventure, debauchery, wonder, mysticism, and miracles. It is a journey into rare experiences, and it is a journey home.

Secularization and the Working Class

The Czech Lands and Central Europe in the 19th Century

Secularization and the Working Class

Secularization and the Working Class brings together contributions from thirteen Central European historians who have taken a long-term interest in the issue of the secularization of modern society and social issues affecting the working class. By using contemporary historical methods they have researched the theoretical aspects of secularization theories as well as individual cases which illustrate Czech developments within the framework of the Austrian monarchy. These cases touch upon working conditions, working-class organizations and political parties, cultural life and means of communication. Among other things they present the conflicts that led to rifts within society. This representative collection of texts is will appeal to historians of modern history interested in the fascinating issues of European development, all those who are interested in the living conditions of the working class in the 19th and 20th centuries.