The Robots' Rebellion – The Story of Spiritual Renaissance

David Icke’s History of the New World Order

The Robots' Rebellion – The Story of Spiritual Renaissance

David Icke’s strongest book to date, The Robots’ Rebellion reveals the alarming extent to which people of all nations are programmed by the ideas fed to them by those in power. We live in a world which is increasingly dominated by technology but, according to Icke, it is we who are the robots. Fearlessly, he tears down the veils of hypocrisy, built up for generations by the corrupt forces of Church, State, science and commerce — and reveals the true pathos of the human condition beneath. He points, too, to the frightening influence wielded throughout the planet by a merciless and manipulative network of secret societies. The existence of long-established links between Earth-bound humanity and beings from other dimensions and planets in the Universe has been suppressed for years, says Icke, by the world’s power-broking hierarchy. When ordinary people learn the real role they have to play within a rich and varied cosmic society, rebellion against those who have kept this extraordinary truth from them will, he predicts, be inevitable. The author is no stranger to controversy. Formerly best-known as a TV sports commentator and leading spokesman for the British Green Party, he is gaining increasing authority as a tireless campaigner for truth. His widely-publicised spiritual transformation has given him the courage to speak out fearlessly against lies deceit. Hidebound politicians, bankers, economists, educationalists, scientists and the leaders of the world’s established religions are not going to welcome Icke’s challenging book. But it is not intended for those who wield and abuse power. This book is for the world’s unwilling robots who, says Icke, in an upbeat conclusion, have it within themselves to rise up — and take control of their own exciting destiny. The Robots’ Rebellion: Table of Contents Introduction Remember Who You Are PART ONE: The Darkness The Takeover Bid Collective Amnesia The Brotherhood of Clans Bible Stories Hell on Earth Arabian Knights The Cracks Appear Eagle Tails The Rule of Science The World at War Big is Beautiful The New World Order When Will We Ever Learn? PART TWO: The Light Goodbye to All That The Economics of Enough The Politics of People The Science of Sanity Bricks in the Wall Exploitation of the Spirit The World Needs Rebels

The Robot's Rebellion

Finding Meaning in the Age of Darwin

The Robot's Rebellion

Responds to the idea that humans are merely survival mechanisms for their own genes, providing the tools to advance human interests over the interests of the replicators through rational self-determination.

The Robotic Imaginary

The Human and the Price of Dehumanized Labor

The Robotic Imaginary

Tracing the connections between human-like robots and AI at the site of dehumanization and exploited labor The word robot—introduced in Karel Čapek’s 1920 play R.U.R.—derives from rabota, the Czech word for servitude or forced labor. A century later, the play’s dystopian themes of dehumanization and exploited labor are being played out in factories, workplaces, and battlefields. In The Robotic Imaginary, Jennifer Rhee traces the provocative and productive connections of contemporary robots in technology, film, art, and literature. Centered around the twinned processes of anthropomorphization and dehumanization, she analyzes the coevolution of cultural and technological robots and artificial intelligence, arguing that it is through the conceptualization of the human and, more important, the dehumanized that these multiple spheres affect and transform each other. Drawing on the writings of Alan Turing, Sara Ahmed, and Arlie Russell Hochschild; such films and novels as Her and The Stepford Wives; technologies like Kismet (the pioneering “emotional robot”); and contemporary drone art, this book explores anthropomorphic paradigms in robot design and imagery in ways that often challenge the very grounds on which those paradigms operate in robotics labs and industry. From disembodied, conversational AI and its entanglement with care labor; embodied mobile robots as they intersect with domestic labor; emotional robots impacting affective labor; and armed military drones and artistic responses to drone warfare, The Robotic Imaginary ultimately reveals how the human is made knowable through the design of and discourse on humanoid robots that are, paradoxically, dehumanized.

Science, Virtue, and the Future of Humanity

Science, Virtue, and the Future of Humanity

This book is an accessible and profound introduction to the key issues facing our country in our biotechnological age. Leading public intellectuals bring to bear a wide and deep learning on particular issues of public policy and discuss the relationship between technological and moral progress that takes place over the course of a human life.

Anatomy of a Robot

Literature, Cinema, and the Cultural Work of Artificial People

Anatomy of a Robot

Why do we find artificial people fascinating? Drawing from a rich fictional and cinematic tradition, Anatomy of a Robot explores the political and textual implications of our perennial projections of humanity onto figures such as robots, androids, cyborgs, and automata. In an engaging, sophisticated, and accessible presentation, Despina Kakoudaki argues that, in their narrative and cultural deployment, artificial people demarcate what it means to be human. They perform this function by offering us a non-human version of ourselves as a site of investigation. Artificial people teach us that being human, being a person or a self, is a constant process and often a matter of legal, philosophical, and political struggle. By analyzing a wide range of literary texts and films (including episodes from Twilight Zone, the fiction of Philip K. Dick, Kazuo Ishiguro’s novel Never Let Me Go, Metropolis, The Golem, Frankenstein, The Terminator, Iron Man, Blade Runner, and I, Robot), and going back to alchemy and to Aristotle’s Physics and De Anima, she tracks four foundational narrative elements in this centuries-old discourse— the fantasy of the artificial birth, the fantasy of the mechanical body, the tendency to represent artificial people as slaves, and the interpretation of artificiality as an existential trope. What unifies these investigations is the return of all four elements to the question of what constitutes the human. This focused approach to the topic of the artificial, constructed, or mechanical person allows us to reconsider the creation of artificial life. By focusing on their historical provenance and textual versatility, Kakoudaki elucidates artificial people’s main cultural function, which is the political and existential negotiation of what it means to be a person.

Attack of the Robots

Attack of the Robots

The robots, turning against their human inventors, threaten to take over Sentai Mountain and it is up to the EXO-FORCE pilots to defeat Striking Venom, the most powerful of the robots.

Black Sun

Aryan Cults, Esoteric Nazism, and the Politics of Identity

Black Sun

More than half a century after the defeat of Nazism and fascism, the far right is again challenging the liberal order of Western democracies. Radical movements are feeding on anxiety about economic globalization, affirmative action, and third-world immigration, flashpoint issues to many traditional groups in multicultural societies. A curious mixture of Aristocratic paganism, anti-Semitic demonology, Eastern philosophies and the occult is influencing populist antigovernment sentiment and helping to exploit the widespread fear that invisible elites are shaping world events. Black Sun examines the new neofascist ideology, showing how hate groups, militias and conspiracy cults attempt to gain influence. Based on interviews and extensive research into underground groups, Black Sun documents the new Nazi and fascist sects that have sprung up from the 1970s through the 1990s and examines the mentality and motivation of these far-right extremists. The result is a detailed, grounded portrait of the mythical and devotional aspects of Hitler cults among Aryan mystics, racist skinheads and Nazi satanists, Heavy Metal music fans, and in occult literature. Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke offers a unique perspective on far right neo-Nazism viewing it as a new form of Western religious heresy. He paints a frightening picture of a religion with its own relics, rituals, prophecies and an international sectarian following that could, under the proper conditions, gain political power and attempt to realize its dangerous millenarian fantasies.

An Anthropology of Robots and AI

Annihilation Anxiety and Machines

An Anthropology of Robots and AI

This book explores the making of robots in labs at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). It examines the cultural ideas that go into the making of robots, and the role of fiction in co-constructing the technological practices of the robotic scientists. The book engages with debates in anthropological theorizing regarding the way that robots are reimagined as intelligent, autonomous and social and weaved into lived social realities. Richardson charts the move away from the “worker” robot of the 1920s to the “social” one of the 2000s, as robots are reimagined as companions, friends and therapeutic agents.

Drama for Students

Presenting Analysis, Context and Criticism on Commonly Studied Dramas

Drama for Students

Alphabetical entries include an introduction, plot summary, author biography, character analysis, and critical overview of style and historical context