The Houses

Temples of the Sky

The Houses

Newly expanded and updated, this absolutely excellent and very welcome addition to the booklist discusses the background of house systems and the meanings of the houses in the context of ancient, traditional and modern astrology. Brilliant book!

The Temple of Mut in Asher

The Temple of Mut in Asher

An 1899 account of the excavations by two British women at the ancient temple of Mut at Karnak, Egypt.

Rhadopis of Nubia

Rhadopis of Nubia

Nobel laureate Naguib Mahfouz mines the riches of his homeland’s ancient past in Rhadopis of Nubia, an unforgettable love story set against the high politics of Egypt’s Sixth Dynasty. While the ravishing courtesan Rhadopis is bathing, a falcon lifts one of her golden sandals and drops it into the lap of the Pharaoh Merenra II. Upon hearing Rhadopis described as “beauty itself,” the young pharaoh decides to return Rhadopis’s sandal himself. When the two meet, they are immediately seized by a passion far stronger than their ability to resist. Thus begins a love affair that makes them the envy of Egyptian society. But blinded by their love and the extravagant attentions they lavish on each other, they ignore the growing resentment of the world around them in this extraordinary tale of star-crossed love. From the Trade Paperback edition.

A Prologue to Revolution

The Political Career of George Grenville (1712-1770)

A Prologue to Revolution

George Grenville was King George III's First Minister from 1763 to 1765. The central issue of Grenville's administration was to deal with the aftermath of the Seven Year's War, particularly with the sharply increased national debt and the cost of continued protection of the American colonies. In seeking to balance the national budget, he blundered into levying taxes on the Americans. The Sugar Act of 1764 aroused very little opposition or even discussion. But it was an entering wedge. The ease with which it sailed through Parliament led Grenville to propose another American tax, the Stamp Act. This aroused vigorous, even violent opposition, both in America and among the business community in Great Britain. Grenville's career also saw the development of numerous techniques for shaping and manipulating public opinion, and he was intimately involved in using them, particularly the newspaper and pamphlet press. He was one of those principally involved in attempting to suppress John Wilkes and the North Briton No. 45, an episode in the evolution of freedom of the press in Great Britain. Grenville was dismissed from office by the King because of issues that had nothing to do with American taxation. The years between 1765 and 1770, between his dismissal and his death, show a mellowing as well as maturing of his political wisdom. Increasingly he played the role of elder statesmen, advising the House of Commons on important questions concerning not only American taxation but freedom of the press and freedom of elections.

A New History of the Holy Bible

From the Beginning of the World to the Establishment of Christianity. With Answers to Most of the Controverted Questions, Dissertations Upon the Most Remarkable Passages, and a Connection of Profane History All Along. To which are Added, Notes, Explaining Difficult Texts, Rectifying Mistranslations, and Reconciling Seeming Contradictions

A New History of the Holy Bible


Walk Like an Egyptian

Walk Like an Egyptian

The calendar material in this expanded edition of Walk Like An Egyptian provides further insight into the mind of the ancient world, a glimpse into a world in which every element of reality was a manifestation of the divine and the cosmic, a time in which even the counting of days and months into years was a mystery of divine proportions. The calendar of ancient Egypt is older than astrology. The Egyptian calendar itself is almost forgotten, yet it is the direct ancestor of the Western calendar in use today. The ancient Egyptians were keenly focused on the concept of life as a journey through time, and the calendar was their map. In Walk Like An Egyptian, you will find one of the world's oldest guides to self-navigation in an easy-to-use format, a daily horoscope from the dawn of history. Each season, month and day is listed with its ancient name, together with the warnings and requirements, stories and scenarios of the gods involved in the story of the year. The day is divided into eight-hour segments of morning, afternoon and night. Sacred ceremonies and ritual feasts are also listed, making the calendar a complete guide to the Egyptian year, a horoscope unlike any other available in the modern world. The earlier editions of Walk Like An Egyptian brought the concepts of ancient Egyptian religion and philosophy into the context of the modern world. Readers around the globe found the once-obscure ideas of ancient wisdom interpreted as profound contemplations of the reality of human nature. Many familiar names in the ancient pantheon were revealed in modern terms, such as: Osiris, the divine and immortal portion of each human's soul clothed in mortal flesh; Re, the divine light of consciousness in the mind; Horus, who is the paradox of the universal nature of each soul's unique identity; Isis, bonding force of the soul; Thoth, representing the power of human thought and intellect, and more. The success of Walk Like An Egyptian led to Wheeler's collaboration with Diana Janeen Pierce, who had assembled a daily calendar of ancient Egyptian ceremonies, rituals and festivals. Wheeler and Pierce worked together on a translation of the lengthy and difficult Cairo Calendar Papyri, one of the few surviving documents detailing the system by which Egyptians organized their daily lives. Wheeler's accompanying interpretation of the Egyptian cosmos makes a lively counterpart to the horoscope, clarifying the often confusing material. Together, Wheeler and Pierce provide a modern evaluation of how to "walk like an Egyptian," attuned to eternity in your daily life and guided by eternal principles.

Episodes in the Lives of Men, Women, and Lovers

Episodes in the Lives of Men, Women, and Lovers

Edith Simcox (1844-1901) was a prominent British feminist, social critic and prolific writer. She published many articles and essays advocating support for women's right to education, improved working conditions and suffrage. Her scholarly works in philosophy and economic history sought to demonstrate that contemporary capitalism was not the only route to a prosperous society. Her articles appeared in many periodicals and among her books are Natural Law (1877) and the two-volume Primitive Civilizations (1894), both also reissued in this series. Simcox was an admirer and friend of the novelist George Eliot (1819-80), and her second book, published in 1882, is a collection of essays on a range of subjects, some of which were inspired by events in Eliot's life. Simcox uses her writings to explore melancholy, love, loss and longing through stories and sketches. For more information on this author, see http://orlando.cambridge.org/public/svPeople?person_id=simced