L.A. '56

A Devil in the City of Angels

L.A. '56

Los Angeles, 1956. Glamorous. Prosperous. The place to see and be seen. But beneath the shiny exterior beats a dark heart. For when the sun goes down, L.A. becomes the noir city of James Ellroy's L.A. Confidential or Walter Mosley's Easy Rawlins novels. Segregation is the unwritten law of the land. The growing black population is expected to keep to South Central. The white cops are encouraged to deal out harsh street justice. In L.A. '56, Joel Engel paints a tense, moody portrait of the city as a devil weaves his way through the shadows. While R&B and hot jazz spill out of record shops and clubs and all-night burger stands, Willie Fields cruises past in his dark green DeSoto, looking for a woman on whom he can bestow the gift of his company. His brilliant idea: Buy a tin badge in the five-and-ten to go along with his big flashlight and Luger and pretend to be an undercover vice cop. The young white girls doing it with their boyfriends in the lovers' lanes dotting the L.A. hills would never say no to a cop. Into the car they go for a ride downtown on a "morals charge," before he kicks out the young man in the middle of nowhere and takes the girl for a ride she'll spend a lifetime trying to forget. There's a bad guy on the loose in the City of Angels. Enter Detective Danny Galindo-he'd worked the Black Dahlia case back in '47 as a rookie. The suave Latino-one of the few in the department-is able to move easily among the white detectives. Maybe it's all those stories he's sold to Jack Webb for Dragnet. When Todd Roark, a black ex-cop, is arrested, Galindo knows he's innocent. But there's no sympathy for Roark among the white cops on the LAPD; Galindo will have to go it alone. There's only one problem: The victims aren't coming forward. The white press ignores the story, too, making Galindo's job that much more difficult. And now he's fallen in love with one of the rapist's first victims. If he's ever found out, he can kiss his badge good-bye. With his back up against a wall, Galindo realizes that it will take some good old-fashioned Hollywood magic to take down a devil in the City of Angels.

The Devil in the City of Angels

My Encounters With the Diabolical

The Devil in the City of Angels

"I went from an indifferent apathetic Sunday Mass attending Catholic Christian to an on fire Catholic Christian in a few short years. What reignited my faith? The many encounters I had with the occult and diabolical." So says renowned Catholic apologist and retired veteran of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department, Jesse Romero. Now for the first time in print, Romero reveals the harrowing details of his experiences with the demonic while working for the LASD. Discover the true stories of spiritual warfare being waged in the streets and alleys of L.A., including: Romero's encounters with Richard Ramirez, the infamous "Night Stalker" How the Rosary drove out a demon that had taken hold of a young man What happened when inmates involved in the occult would try to say "Jesus is Lord" How a young man who had committed suicide returned to beg his parents for prayers to release him from the pains of Purgatory ...and much more. The Devil in the City of Angels is much more than a catalog of strange and terrifying events. It exposes Satan as the Father of Lies so we can see how he works, and how to defeat him. Drawing on his own experiences as well as the most authoritative sources, Romero offers the reader numerous cautionary tales, ut also that hope that is only found in Jesus Christ and his Church.

Guaranteed Pure

The Moody Bible Institute, Business, and the Making of Modern Evangelicalism

Guaranteed Pure

American evangelicalism has long walked hand in hand with modern consumer capitalism. Timothy Gloege shows us why, through an engaging story about God and big business at the Moody Bible Institute. Founded in Chicago by shoe-salesman-turned-revivalist Dwight Lyman Moody in 1889, the institute became a center of fundamentalism under the guidance of the innovative promoter and president of Quaker Oats, Henry Crowell. Gloege explores the framework for understanding humanity shared by these business and evangelical leaders, whose perspectives clearly differed from those underlying modern scientific theories. At the core of their "corporate evangelical" framework was a modern individualism understood primarily in terms of economic relations. Conservative evangelicalism and modern business grew symbiotically, transforming the ways that Americans worshipped, worked, and consumed. Gilded Age evangelicals initially understood themselves primarily as new "Christian workers--employees of God guided by their divine contract, the Bible. But when these ideas were put to revolutionary ends by Populists, corporate evangelicals reimagined themselves as savvy religious consumers and reformulated their beliefs. Their consumer-oriented "orthodoxy" displaced traditional creeds and undermined denominational authority, forever altering the American religious landscape. Guaranteed pure of both liberal theology and Populist excesses, this was a new form of old-time religion not simply compatible with modern consumer capitalism but uniquely dependent on it.

The Mammoth Book of Angels & Demons

The Mammoth Book of Angels & Demons

Despite our tendency to think of the demonic as evil and the angelic as good, our own legends don't always bear this out. Angels can be the incarnation of light and salvation, but they can also fall - Satan himself is a fallen angel. Demons can be truly demonic, but these unearthly creatures can also, on occasion, lend humankind a hand. Temptation can lead to revelation, supernatural messengers who bring true justice may not be welcomed, and beings seeking redemption can be blind to mortal needs. Stories from world-renowned authors of science fiction and fantasy - including Neil Gaiman, George R. R. Martin and Joyce Carol Oates - and rising stars portray angels in all their glory, demons at their most dreadful, and a surprising variety of modern interpretations of ancient myth.

Religion and Media

Religion and Media

Counter The twenty-five contributors to this volume - who include such influential thinkers as Jacques Derrida, Jean-Luc Nancy, Talal Asad, and James Siegel - confront the conceptual, analytical, and empirical difficulties involved in addressing the complex relationship between religion and media. The book's introductory section offers a prolegomenon to the multiple problems raised by an interdisciplinary approach to these multifaceted phenomena. The essays in the following part provide exemplary approaches to the historical and systematic background to the study of religion and media. The third part presents case studies by anthropologists and scholars of comparative religion. The book concludes with two remarkable documents: a chapter from Theodor W. Adorno's study of the relationship between religion and media in the context of political agitation (The Psychological Technique of Martin Luther Thomas's Radio Addresses) and a section from Niklas Luhmann's monumental Die Gesellschaft der Gesellschaft (Society as a Social System).

How to See the Holy Spirit, Angels, and Demons

Ignatius of Loyola on the Gift of Discerning of Spirits in Church Ethics

How to See the Holy Spirit, Angels, and Demons

Are God, angels, and demons really invisible? Or can the spirits be seen with human eyes, through the lens of Church Ethics? The gift of discerning of spirits is indispensible to the study of church ethics. Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Society of Jesus (Jesuits), wrote two sets of Rules for Discerning of Spirits in his Spiritual Exercises in the early 1500s. He taught how the church can receive from God the gift to see otherwise invisible angels, demons, and the Holy Spirit. Ignatius' views were influenced by John Cassian, Jacobus de Voragine, Ludolph of Saxony, and Thomas à Kempis. Ignatius' Rules are exegeted in dialogue with contemporary scholars Karl Rahner, Hugo Rahner, Piet Penning de Vries, Jules Toner, and Timothy Gallagher, and applied to one study of ecclesial ethics in the narrative theology of Samuel Wells. A four-step Ignatian pneumato-ethical method is developed, which any analyst can follow to see the spirits, by consolation/desolation, consent, manifestation, and pneumato-ethics. This method revolutionizes how we study ecclesiology, soteriology, missiology/world religions, liturgy, worship, Eucharist, hermeneutics, homiletics, pastoral counseling, church history, and politics. The spirits are not invisible at all. They can be clearly discerned through the lens of ecclesial ethics.

Angels of the New Era

33 Days to Teach Your Soul How to Fly

Angels of the New Era

Teach your soul how to fly in thirty-three days. Use the three powers of your soul: the memory, the intellect, and the will to encounter God. The method uses fifteen stories of Angels in the Bible that help you learn how to meditate, and then you can teach others how to meditate. The normal way that God speaks to His creatures comes through the gifts of wisdom, knowledge, and understanding. These gifts come as thoughts to the mind. Meditation helps us hear Gods voice and to respond in a way that is beneficial to our eternal soul.

Angels A to Z

Angels A to Z

Written by two recognized authorities on nontraditional religious movements, this resource is one of the most comprehensive books on angels and related topics currently available. More than 300 entries are included and drawn from multiple religions, such as Christianity, Islam, and Hindu traditions, as well as from pop culture. A variety of angel topics are discussed, including celebrity angels, classifications of angels, obscure angels still waiting for their big break, guardian angels, fallen angels, Anaheim angels, biblical figures associated with angels, angels in art and architecture, and angels in the media and literature. Angels are also discussed in terms of the occult and metaphysics, with entries on UFOs, fairies, and witches. A comprehensive resource section lists movies, books, magazines, and organizations related to angels.

City of God

City of God

St Augustine, bishop of Hippo, was one of the central figures in the history of Christianity, and City of God is one of his greatest theological works. Written as an eloquent defence of the faith at a time when the Roman Empire was on the brink of collapse, it examines the ancient pagan religions of Rome, the arguments of the Greek philosophers and the revelations of the Bible. Pointing the way forward to a citizenship that transcends the best political experiences of the world and offers citizenship that will last for eternity, City of God is one of the most influential documents in the development of Christianity.

The City of God

The City of God

Augustine of Hippo was Bishop of Hippo Regius (present-day Annaba, Algeria). He was a Latin-speaking philosopher and theologian who lived in the Roman Africa Province. His writings were very influential in the development of Western Christianity.According to his contemporary, Jerome, Augustine “established anew the ancient Faith.” This classic work, The City of God, was translated into several languages and played an important role in the spreading of the ideals of Eastern and Western Christianity.