Refuse to Choose!

A Revolutionary Program for Doing Everything That You Love

Refuse to Choose!

Identifies seven personality types that share a common quality of having numerous unrelated interests, explaining how readers can prioritize and pursue multiple goals simultaneously in order to enjoy successful and varied lives. By the author of Wishcraft. 75,000 first printing.

I Refuse to Choose

The Best of Both Worlds

I Refuse to Choose

This is the story of Mayah, a young girl who has a different sort of family. Maya's mother is African-American and her father is Puerto-Rican, which fills her with joy as she is part of two cultures. One day at school she feels pressured to choose which of her family's cultures she has to be part of. Follow her story as she makes important decisions and learns valuable lessons about herself and about how to navigate the world as a proud biracial child.

The Gift of Beauty

The Good as Art

The Gift of Beauty

Traces the history of the idea of art as an ethical movement, interpreting the good as nature's abundance, giving rise to an ethics of inclusion, expressed in art.

Works

Works


Tributes

Tributes

As Dr. Frederick Douglas Harpers 12th book of poetry with prose, Tributes, honors and pays homage to both the living and the dead. There are tributes to exceptional human beings based on their miraculous creations or their sustained humanitarian servicesexceptional human beings such as Helen Keller, Mother Teresa, Harriet Tubman, Frederick Douglass, Mohandas (Mahatma) Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Albert Schweitzer. There are tributes to exceptional human beings whom the author knows; those unsung heroes who have consistently sacrificed to help others. This book honors the dead who sacrifi ced much to benefi t or bring joy to others (e.g., Michael Jackson) or those who died unjustly at the hands of the unjust (e.g., Emmett Till). Also, there are tributes for special occasions (e.g.,birthday) and to persons in special groups (e.g., school or college graduates and outstanding athletes). Finally, there are tributes to two courageous animals (a dove and a dog) based on true stories of valor and character.

Choosing Not to Choose

Understanding the Value of Choice

Choosing Not to Choose

Our ability to make choices is fundamental to our sense of ourselves as human beings, and essential to the political values of freedom-protecting nations. Whom we love; where we work; how we spend our time; what we buy; such choices define us in the eyes of ourselves and others, and much blood and ink has been spilt to establish and protect our rights to make them freely. Choice can also be a burden. Our cognitive capacity to research and make the best decisions is limited, so every active choice comes at a cost. In modern life the requirement to make active choices can often be overwhelming. So, across broad areas of our lives, from health plans to energy suppliers, many of us choose not to choose. By following our default options, we save ourselves the costs of making active choices. By setting those options, governments and corporations dictate the outcomes for when we decide by default. This is among the most significant ways in which they effect social change, yet we are just beginning to understand the power and impact of default rules. Many central questions remain unanswered: When should governments set such defaults, and when should they insist on active choices? How should such defaults be made? What makes some defaults successful while others fail? Cass R. Sunstein has long been at the forefront of developing public policy and regulation to use government power to encourage people to make better decisions. In this major new book, Choosing Not to Choose, he presents his most complete argument yet for how we should understand the value of choice, and when and how we should enable people to choose not to choose. The onset of big data gives corporations and governments the power to make ever more sophisticated decisions on our behalf, defaulting us to buy the goods we predictably want, or vote for the parties and policies we predictably support. As consumers we are starting to embrace the benefits this can bring. But should we? What will be the long-term effects of limiting our active choices on our agency? And can such personalized defaults be imported from the marketplace to politics and the law? Confronting the challenging future of data-driven decision-making, Sunstein presents a manifesto for how personalized defaults should be used to enhance, rather than restrict, our freedom and well-being.

The One Year Book of Hope Devotional

The One Year Book of Hope Devotional

This popular devotional is now in a special LeatherLike edition! In this life, pain and disappointment are real. Maybe you’ve been wounded by a family member or friend. Perhaps you know the pain of losing someone you love or of a difficult medical diagnosis. Sometimes we need to know there’s hope for when life just hurts. Nancy Guthrie knows what it’s like to hurt—sometimes so much that there aren’t words to describe the pain. In this beautiful deluxe edition of The One Year Book of Hope, she encourages you to spend this year learning to hope when life has let you down. She offers no trite answers or quick cures; just remarkable, hopeful daily insights from the depths of Scripture and her own experiences. This year, join Nancy each day in growing closer to God—the source of all comfort.

The Birth of God in You

The Birth of God in You

BOOKS BY DR. JOSEPH MURPHY The Amazing Laws of Cosmic Mind Power The Cosmic Energizer: Miracle Power of the Universe The Cosmic Power Within You Great Bible Truths for Human Problems The Healing Power of Love How to Attract Money How to Pray with a Deck of Cards How to Use the Power of Prayer How to Use Your Healing Power Infinite Power for Richer Living Living Without Strain Love is Freedom Magic of Faith Mental Poisons and Their Antidotes The Miracle of Mind Dynamics Miracle Power for Infinite Riches Peace Within Yourself The Power Of Your Subconscious Mind Pray Your Way Through It Prayer is the Answer Psychic Perception: The Meaning of Extrasensory Power Quiet Moments with God Secrets of the I Ching Songs of God Special Meditations for Health, Wealth, Love, and Expression Stay Young Forever Supreme Mastery of Fear Telepsychics: The Magic Power of Perfect Living Why Did This Happen to Me? Within You is the Power Write Your Name in the Book of Life Your Infinite Power to be Rich

Separate Roads to Feminism

Black, Chicana, and White Feminist Movements in America's Second Wave

Separate Roads to Feminism

The development of the era known as the 'second wave' of US feminist protest.

Shaping Our Selves

On Technology, Flourishing, and a Habit of Thinking

Shaping Our Selves

When bioethicists debate the use of technologies like surgery and pharmacology to shape our selves, they are, ultimately, debating what it means for human beings to flourish. They are debating what makes animals like us truly happy, and whether the technologies at issue will bring us closer to or farther from such happiness. The positions that participants adopt in debates regarding such ancient and fundamental questions are often polarized, and cannot help but be deeply personal. It is no wonder that the debates are sometimes acrimonious. How, then, should critics of and enthusiasts about technological self-transformation move forward? Based on his experience at the oldest free-standing bioethics research institute in the world, Erik Parens proposes a habit of thinking, which he calls "binocular." As our brains integrate slightly different information from our two eyes to achieve depth of visual perception, we need to try to integrate greatly different insights on the two sides of the debates about technologically shaping our selves-if depth of intellectual understanding is what we are after. Binocular thinking lets us benefit from the insights that are visible from the stance of the enthusiast, who emphasizes that using technology to creatively transform our selves will make us happier, and to benefit from the insights that are visible from the stance of the critic, who emphasizes that learning to let our selves be will make us happier. Parens observes that in debates as personal as these, we all-critics and enthusiasts alike-give reasons that we are partial to. In the throes of our passion to make our case, we exaggerate our insights and all-too-often fall into the conceptual traps that language sets for us. Foolishly, we make conceptual choices that no one who truly wanted understanding would accept: Are technologies value-free or value-laden? Are human beings by nature creators or creatures? Is disability a medical or a social phenomenon? Indeed, are we free or determined? Parens explains how participating in these debates for two decades helped him articulate the binocular habit of thinking that is better at benefiting from the insights in both poles of those binaries than was the habit of thinking he originally brought to the debates. Finally, Parens celebrates that bioethics doesn't aspire only to deeper thinking, but also to better acting. He embraces not only the intellectual aspiration to think deeply about meaning questions that don't admit of final answers, but also the ethical demand to give clear answers to practical questions. To show how to respect both that aspiration and that demand, the book culminates in the description of a process of truly informed consent, in the context of one specific form of using technology to shape our selves: families making decisions about appearance normalizing surgeries for children with atypical bodies.