Jung and the Lost Gospels

Insights into the Dead Sea Scrolls and the Nag Hammadi Library

Jung and the Lost Gospels

The "Lost Gospels" refer to the Dead Sea Scrolls and the Nag Hammadi Library, both discovered in the 1940s. The Nag Hammadi Library consists of writings found by two peasants who unearthed clay jars in 1945 in upper Egypt. These did not appear in English for 32 years, because the right to publish was contended by scholars, politicians, and antique dealers. The Dead Sea Scrolls, discovered in clay jars in Palestine by a goatherder in 1947, weathered similar storms. The first team of analysts were mostly Christian clergy, who weren't anxious to share material that frightened church leaders. As Dr. Hoeller shows, they rightly feared the documents would reveal information that might detract from unique claims of Christianity. Indeed, the Dead Sea Scrolls and Nag Hammadi Library both contradict and complement accepted tenets of the Old and New Testaments.

Dreaming the Myth Onwards

New Directions in Jungian Therapy and Thought

Dreaming the Myth Onwards

Dreaming the Myth Onwards shows how a revised appreciation of myth can enrich our daily lives, our psychological awareness, and our human relationships. Lucy Huskinson and her contributors explore the interplay between myth, and Jungian thought and practice, demonstrating the philosophical and psychological principles that underlie our experience of psyche and world. Contributors from multi-disciplinary backgrounds throughout the world come together to assess the contemporary relevance of myth, in terms of its utility, its effectual position within Jungian theory and practice, and as a general approach for making sense of life. As well as examining the more conscious facets of myth, this volume discusses the unconscious psychodynamic "processes of myth", including active imagination, transference, and countertransference, to illustrate just how these mythic phenomena give meaning to Jungian theory and therapeutic experience. This rigorous and scholarly analysis showcases fresh readings of central Jungian concepts, updated in accordance with shifts in the cultural and epistemological concerns of contemporary Western consciousness. Dreaming the Myth Onwards will be essential reading for practicing analysts and academics in the field of the arts and social sciences.

The Inner West

The Inner West

The founder of the influential Gnosis magazine collects essays by some of today's finest spiritual writers to explore the West's magical and esoteric traditions. Rosicrucianism, Freemasonry, Gnosticism, The Knights Templar . . . Even before the success of The Da Vinci Code, many readers knew of these and other aspects of Western esoterica. But few understand their true meaning. In The Inner West, more than twenty essays by seventeen leading authors shine a light on some of the most mysterious and closely held aspects of the Western tradition. Its authors bring to life the symbolist and occult philosophies that populate the history and beliefs of the Western way. These same philosophies-which include variants of Christian and Jewish mysticism, and the teachings of figures like Rudolf Steiner and G. I. Gurdjieff-can present a deep and different spiritual path for today's seekers. Spiritual seekers have often looked to the East for inspiration and guidance. Yet increasing numbers of people are discovering that many helpful wisdom traditions have existed right here in the West. With the Kabbalah and Tarot cards more popular than ever, and alternative spirituality from Wicca to Sufism gaining a new audience, The Inner West is a timely book for this expanding audience

Pocketful of Miracles

Prayer, Meditations, and Affirmations to Nurture Your Spirit Every Day of the Year

Pocketful of Miracles

From the New York Times bestselling author of Minding the Body, Mending the Mind comes a powerful collection of spiritual activities that we can use every day in order to create miracles in our lives. Through daily meditations and exercises, Borysenko helps us to let go of fear and realize the light of peace.

The Lost Gospel

The Quest for the Gospel of Judas Iscariot

The Lost Gospel

Judas Iscariot. He’s been hated and reviled through the ages as Jesus Christ’s betrayer– the close friend who sells him out for 30 pieces of silver. But history also records other information about Judas Iscariot. One such reference was written in 180 by an influential Church Father named St. Irenaeus who railed against the Gospel of Judas for depicting the last days of Jesus from the perspective of the disgraced apostle. In its pages, Judas is Christ’s favorite. It’s a startlingly different story than the one handed down through the ages. Once it was denounced as heresy, the Gospel of Judas faded from sight. It became one of history’s forgotten manuscripts. Until now. In this compelling and exhaustively researched account, Herbert Krosney unravels how the Gospel of Judas was found and its meaning painstakingly teased from the ancient Coptic script that had hid its message for centuries. With all the skills of an investigative journalist and master storyteller, Krosney traces the forgotten gospel’s improbable journey across three continents, a trek that would take it through the netherworld of the international antiquities trade, until the crumbling papyrus is finally made to give up its secrets. The race to discover the Gospel of Judas will go down as one of the great detective stories of biblical archaeology.

Action, Reflection, and Social Justice

Integrating Moral Reasoning Into Professional Development

Action, Reflection, and Social Justice

The troubling gap between moral values and professional action poses a serious problem for professional education that is not easily resolved by offering courses on ethics or moral development. This text provides a new framework for profesors and practitioners who are seeking deeper integration of moral reasoning into professional education and interventions. Using action research in leadership classes, along with studies of interventions in schools and colleges, the author tests claims embedded in theories of action science, reflective proactice, adult development, and communicative action, to develop his new framework for professional development and intervention.