Goddesses in Older Women

Archetypes in Women Over Fifty

Goddesses in Older Women

At some point after fifty, every woman crosses a threshold into the third phase of her life. As she enters this uncharted territory -- one that is generally uncelebrated in popular culture -- she can choose to mourn what has gone before, or she can embrace the juicy crone years. In this celebration of Act 3, Jungian analyst Jean Shinoda Bolen names the powerful new energies and potentials, or archetypes, that come into the psyche at this momentous time, suggesting that women getting older have profound and exciting reasons for welcoming the other side of fifty. As Bolen has explained in her remarkable body of work, there are goddesses in every woman, deep archetypal sources of wisdom, authenticity and spirituality that, once tapped, energize us and give us a sense of meaning and self- acceptance. The knowledge of which archetypes are active within us at each phase of life-maiden, mother (or matron), and cronesupports us in making choices that are true to who we are instead of conforming to others' ideas of who we should be. In Bolen's bestselling Goddesses in Everywoman, the classic work of the women's spirituality movement, the Greek goddesses personified these archetypes as they affected the first two phases of a woman's adult life. Now she explains that in the third stage, marked physiologically by menopause, there emerges a whole new cast of inner archetypes that a woman can draw on for guidance, creativity, personal integration, and joy. Once we learn to recognize these forces, we can feel empowered and wise, introspective and spiritual, sexually bold and full of mirth. For it is in the "wisewoman" years, when a woman has lived long enough to resolve the tasks of younger and middle adulthood, that she can fully and authentically become who she deeply is. The generation of women who are approaching or who have reached the crone years is historically unique. Influenced by the women's movement, they have benefited from educational opportunities, women's support networks, and economic resources as excellent preparation for decades of active postmenopausal life. By recognizing the goddess archetypes that emerge in this phase, women of this special generation will be enabled to transform the crone years into the best years of their lives.

Crones Don't Whine

Concentrated Wisdom for Juicy Women

Crones Don't Whine

Skip the midlife crisis and embrace the joys of aging with this “lighthearted manual on how to become a juicy and wise old woman” (Isabelle Allende, recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom). Having dedicated her life to helping women realize their full potential at every phase of life, distinguished psychiatrist and bestselling author Jean Shinoda Bolen, MD, continues her inspiring and illuminating work with Crones Don’t Whine. Here, Bolen defines thirteen qualities women should cultivate to continue their personal growth into their crone years. Featuring brief essays and small practices, this lighthearted book gives readers resources to turn to again and again. Life doesn’t end at forty. So why do so many women act as if it does? Put aside your midlife crisis symptoms and embrace the aging process with a new and empowering archetype for older women: Crones Don't Whine—they’re juicy, confident, and fierce about what matters to them. They speak the truth with compassion. They listen to their bodies, reinvent themselves, and savor the good in their lives. As Bolen explains, crone years are “growing” years in women’s lives. In this new stage, women can finally devote their time, energy, and creativity to what really matters to them. “A wise and honest book” —Alice Walker, Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award–winning author of The Color Purple

Demeter and Persephone

Lessons from a Myth

Demeter and Persephone

The classical Greek myth of Demeter and her daughter Persephone as told in Homer's Hymn to Demeter has been used most often to explain the cycle of the seasons. However, a closer examination will reveal insights on living and dying, loss and reconciliation, and suffering and healing. This work demostrates the continued importance and relevance of the myth of Demeter and Persephone to today's society. The first three chapters provide a summary of the Homeric story and examine the myth from the perspectives of the mother and daughter. The following chapters discuss the symbolism of critical objects, the role of female mentoring, the role of Hades and the meaning of the underworld, the subject of rape, and the masculinist perspective presented by Zeus and Helios, and derive lessons useful for healing and knowledge. The Hymn to Demeter as translated by Helene Foley is included as an appendix in order to provide a basis for the discussion in the text. Notes and a bibliography also follow the text.

The Goddess in Every Girl

Develop Your Feminine Power

The Goddess in Every Girl

A guidebook to the goddess religion outlines fifty ideas for getting in touch with one's inner divinity, sharing exercises to encourage readers to identify true goals, build confidence, and create healthy plans for personal achievement.

Moving Toward the Millionth Circle

Energizing the Global Women's Movement

Moving Toward the Millionth Circle

In Jungian analyst and activist Jean Shinoda Bolen’s writing, symbol, archetype, soul work, and synchronicity come together with activism and the potential to change the world or save the planet when grassroots and enlightened leaders work together. In her latest book, Moving Toward the Millionth Circle, Dr. Bolen inspires and enlists women to be millionth circle, heart-centered activists in order to energize a 5th World Conference on Women in the 21st Century. The conference is not a goal in and of itself, but a means toward valuing women and the feminine to bring about a tipping point. Moving Toward the Millionth Circle is a sequel to Dr. Bolen’s popular The Millionth Circle (1999) with a slightly different focus. Her first book describes how real change happens when a critical number of people adopt a new perspective with how-to sections on ways to create women’s circles with a sacred center. While still about women’s circles, her new book focuses more on activism and how these circles can help to sustain and support (and be a sanctuary for) women working for change in their lives and in the world.

Goddesses in World Culture

Goddesses in World Culture

This collection of accessible essays relates the stories of individual goddesses from around the world, exploring their roles in the cultures from which they came, their histories and status today, and the controversies surrounding them. * 63 essays cover more than 100 goddesses and goddess-like figures from world culture, with volumes organized by geographic area * Many original translations of prayers, sagas, and other sources not otherwise readily available in English * 60 illustrations include ethnographic photographs, depictions of ancient artifacts, and original artwork * An extensive list of bibliography of sources about the figure and culture discussed accompanies each essay

Artemis

The Indomitable Spirit in Everywoman

Artemis

In Jean Shinoda Bolen’s best-selling, game-changing Goddesses in Everywoman, myths came to life in a whole new way that resonated with our own lives. Even fictional character Bridget Jones was reading that book. Now comes Artemis: The Indomitable Spirit in Everywoman, a groundbreaking new book that explores the archetype of the activist. Indomitable means untamed, unsubdued. It is the one-in-herself quality in girls and women who will not be victims, no matter what. To bring the Artemis archetype to life, Dr. Bolen delves deeply into the myth of Atalanta, the famous hunter and runner in ancient Greek mythology, a mortal woman who is identified with Artemis the Greek Goddess of the Hunt and Moon. Atalanta began life abandoned and left to die because she was born a girl. She faced the Calydon Boar and drew first blood; she was the runner who would demand to be beaten in a footrace by the man who could claim her as his bride. Atalanta exemplifies the indomitable spirit in competent, courageous girls and in the women they become. This is grit, the passion and persistence to go the distance, to survive, and to succeed. Dr. Bolen paints a vivid picture of Artemis women in current media, including Princess Merida from the animated film Brave and Katniss Everdeen from The Hunger Games. In all these examples and those of real-life women who grow into their Artemis spirit, she provides the means through which readers can navigate their own personal exploration to become their authentic selves. Bolen dedicates this book to women and girls who embody the archetype of Artemis, who discover her uncrushable spirit in themselves or others.

Artemis

The Indomitable Spirit in Everywoman

Artemis

From fictional characters like Bridget Jones to feminist icons like Gloria Steinem, Jean Bolen’s bestselling classic Goddesses in Everywoman has been widely read and soundly praised. Now comes a new book written in the same spirit and with the same vitality. In Artemis: The Indomitable Spirit in Everywoman, Bolen invites women and girls to discover the tenacity and courage of the Artemis archetype and how it can be tapped to live authentically. To tell the story, Bolen delves deeply into the myth of Atalanta, the famous hunter and runner in ancient Greek mythology, a mortal woman who is identified with Artemis the Greek Goddess of the Hunt and Moon. Atalanta began life abandoned and left to die because she was born a girl. She faced the Calydon Boar and drew first blood; she was the runner who would demand to be beaten in a footrace by the man who could claim her as his bride. She exemplifies the indomitable spirit in competent, courageous girls and in the women they become. This is grit, the passion and persistence to go the distance, to survive, and to succeed. She includes many real-life stories as well as mythological and fictional examples of women who are similar to Atalanta, including among others Princess Merida from the animated film Brave and Katniss from The Hunger Games. Artemis and Atalanta are the means through which readers can navigate their own personal exploration to become their authentic selves. Bolen dedicates this book to women and girls who embody the archetype of Artemis, who discover her uncrushable spirit in themselves or others.

Mother and Myth in Spanish Novels

Rewriting the Maternal Archetype

Mother and Myth in Spanish Novels

Remembering the forgotten mother is a major theme in Myth and Mother in Spanish Novels and reflects the current interest in the recuperation of historic memory in Spain. The novels in this study feature mature protagonists who recall their mothers as a way to define their own identities and to nullify the fictional matricide prevalent in post-war Spanish novels; this twenty-first-century fiction highlights the haunting presence of the mother and begs comparison with myth.

Finding Gifts in Depression

An Artist's Journey

Finding Gifts in Depression

Depression can overwhelm you and everything you do. It can also provide you with a powerful opportunity to free your inner artist and write, sketch, sculpt, cook, or paint your way to a more authentic and more contented you. When accomplished and talented artist Carolyn Freeman Hansen fell under the shadow of depression, she refused to let the darkness consume her. She turned to what she knew-art-and realized the remarkable healing and restorative powers of all things creative. Hansen combines the honest and intimate account of her own triumph over depression with personal advice, creative healing exercises, and helpful resources for using art as a tool to summon strength, gain perspective, and find peace. Under Hansen's seasoned guidance, you will discover the many unexpected and precious gifts of depression, including courage, forgiveness, and spirituality. Filled with images of Hansen's art and bursting with inspiration and encouragement, Finding Gifts in Depression gives you everything you need to become the person you were meant to be.