Dying to Be Free

A Healing Guide for Families after a Suicide

Dying to Be Free

Honest, gentle advice for those who have survived an unspeakable loss—the suicide of a loved one. Surviving the heartbreak of a loved one's suicide - you don't have to go through it alone. Authors Beverly Cobain and Jean Larch break through suicide's silent stigma in Dying to Be Free, offering gentle advice for those left behind, so that healing can begin.

Dying to Be Free

From Enforced Secrecy To Near Death To True Transformation

Dying to Be Free

In this compelling memoir, Hannah Robinson relates how she was injured in an accident while on holiday in Tenerife, sustaining life-threatening multiple injuries. While still "unconscious" she entered a "near-death experience", where she experienced true peace and love. She also received the information she needed to come to terms with the biggest, negative issue she would continue to face; the life-long rejection and enforced secrecy of her father, a Catholic priest. While healing in hospital and at home, Hannah started to understand how her father's actions and her near-death experience were inextricably linked; that they'd both occurred at all was more than just coincidence. Within these pages, Hannah shares many of the stages of her life-transforming journey, both wonderful and excruciating, that have brought her to a deeper understanding of how and why this all happened. Increasingly struck by the contrast between her own spiritual experience and her treatment by the Catholic Church, Hannah examines the relationship between organised religion and near-death experiences and makes a good argument for love being the most emotionally, spiritually and psychologically healing power there is; one that transcends human belief systems and ultimately unites us all as one.

Dying to be Thin

Tools for Battling the Bulimia Beast

Dying to be Thin

Dying to Be Thin helps those struggling with bulimia transform their time, energy, and relationship with their family. After battling for over twenty years with bulimia, Noelle Gilbert has overcome the mental and physical struggle caused by living with an eating disorder. She is now able to devote her time to a life of freedom and enjoyment with her children. In Dying to Be Thin, Noelle offers those struggling with bulimia the unconventional strategies that will help them regain power and strength over bulimia. Dying to Be Thin reveals: Raw accounts of the mental and physical bondage one lives with daily due to bulimia Why conventional treatments may not have worked Strategies to stop the binge/purge cycle Methods to heal the entire body in order to free up mental space How to recognize power and strength in overcoming bulimia

Dying to Be Reborn

Similarities and Parallels Between the Birth and Death Process

Dying to Be Reborn

This book explores some of the many similarities and parallels between the birth and death process. It does not rely on the testimony of people who have had near death experiences. Neither does it base its argument on the kind of mystical experience that is not available to most people. The exploration of this material requires only the active critical participation of the reader. Therefore, neither faith nor the testimony of some authority is necessary; only the willingness to suspend judgment until the deeper resources of ones own experience can be critically examined. My view is that in many ways culture in the West has it upside down and backwards. In my own small way, I am trying to counteract a cultural bias, that in its narrow definition of wisdom, has virtually nothing to say about soul cultivation and the process of dying to be reborn.

Dying To Be Loved

Dying To Be Loved

Love can sometimes take you to some of the most unimaginable places, both good and bad. Sometimes it's not until we reach rock bottom that we realize that the love that we've been searching for has been with us all along. Dying To Be Loved allows readers to experience a different kind of love story. One that shows the different challenges you face in dealing with love. "Love" in its present form is used as a term of expression and endearment however, Dying To Be Loved allows the reader to visualize and experience love from different angles. The author takes you on an emotional roller coaster covering issues such as friendship, depression, abuse, abandonment, religion, self-esteem, loss of love, crazy love and storybook love. You'll laugh, you'll cry but by the end you will hopefully be thanking GOD for your life. SYNOPSIS Meet Kent, Kyndal and Gabrielle, three characters living totally separate lives all on a quest to find real love. Follow them as they struggle to survive and break away from their destructive past experiences with love, making many sacrifices along the way. As pain leads them in different directions, one thing is consistent, love hurts. Will Kyndal, the praised women's counselor whom was left standing at the altar, allow the hurt from her childhood to break her down mentally to the point of no return? Will Gabrielle, the professional, allow the race of her dream husband to overshadow his abuse or will her eyes finally open when her life is on the line? Will Kent's womanizing ways change after an unexpected attack on his life? Are they willing to give their lives to be loved? Or will their struggles ultimately lead them to the altar? Join them on their journey in the fight of their lives, all for love sake.

Dying to Be Men

Gender and Language in Early Christian Martyr Texts

Dying to Be Men

At once brave and athletic, virtuous and modest, female martyrs in the second and third centuries were depicted as self-possessed gladiators who at the same time exhibited the quintessentially "womanly" qualities of modesty, fertility, and beauty. L. Stephanie Cobb explores the double embodiment of "male" and "female" gender ideals in these figures, connecting them to Greco-Roman virtues and the construction of Christian group identities. Both male and female martyrs conducted their battles in the amphitheater, a masculine environment that enabled the divine combatants to showcase their strength, virility, and volition. These Christian martyr accounts also illustrated masculinity through the language of justice, resistance to persuasion, and-more subtly but most effectively-the juxtaposition of "unmanly" individuals (usually slaves, the old, or the young) with those at the height of male maturity and accomplishment (such as the governor or the proconsul). Imbuing female martyrs with the same strengths as their male counterparts served a vital function in Christian communities. Faced with the possibility of persecution, Christians sought to inspire both men and women to be braver than pagan and Jewish men. Yet within the community itself, traditional gender roles had to be maintained, and despite the call to be manly, Christian women were expected to remain womanly in relation to the men of their faith. Complicating our understanding of the social freedoms enjoyed by early Christian women, Cobb's investigation reveals the dual function of gendered language in martyr texts and its importance in laying claim to social power.

To Die in Cuba

Suicide and Society

To Die in Cuba

For much of the nineteenth century and all of the twentieth, the per capita rate of suicide in Cuba was the highest in Latin America and among the highest in the world--a condition made all the more extraordinary in light of Cuba's historic ties to the Catholic church. In this richly illustrated social and cultural history of suicide in Cuba, Louis A. Perez Jr. explores the way suicide passed from the unthinkable to the unremarkable in Cuban society. In a study that spans the experiences of enslaved Africans and indentured Chinese in the colony, nationalists of the twentieth-century republic, and emigrants from Cuba to Florida following the 1959 revolution, Perez finds that the act of suicide was loaded with meanings that changed over time. Analyzing the social context of suicide, he argues that in addition to confirming despair, suicide sometimes served as a way to consecrate patriotism, affirm personal agency, or protest injustice. The act was often seen by suicidal persons and their contemporaries as an entirely reasonable response to circumstances of affliction, whether economic, political, or social. Bringing an important historical perspective to the study of suicide, Perez offers a valuable new understanding of the strategies with which vast numbers of people made their way through life--if only to choose to end it. To Die in Cuba ultimately tells as much about Cubans' lives, culture, and society as it does about their self-inflicted deaths.

Unfinished Conversation

Healing from Suicide and Loss

Unfinished Conversation

Unfinished Conversations is a story of profound grief and the journey to healing that followed. Based on a journal Robert Lesoine kept during the two years following the suicide of his best friend, Unfinished Conversations will help readers through the process of reflecting on and affirming the raw immediacy of survivors’ emotions. Each short chapter focuses on a different aspect of the author’s experience as he transforms his anger and guilt to understanding and forgiveness. Licensed psychotherapist Marilynne Chöphel brings her professional background to Robert Lesoine’s deeply personal story to create an accessible path to self-directed healing based on mindful awareness and sound clinical practices. Readers work through their own grieving and healing process with end-of-chapter exercises and activities. An appendix and website, unfinishedconversation.com, provide additional resources to survivors. The tools and techniques in Unfinished Conversations will help readers release past trauma, honor their relationship with their lost loved one, and find greater perspective, meaning, and well-being in their lives.

The Truth about Death and Dying

The Truth about Death and Dying

Offers clear and concise information and covers the many issues, feelings, and processes that relate to death and dying.